Many people are diabetic without realising it. Could you be one of them? This is a huge problem which the medical profession is faced with on a daily basis. As the average age of the population increases more and more people reach the age of 65 which is the point at which diabetes becomes more prevalent. In addition to this more people under the age of 65 get very little exercise which is another factor in the increasing prevalence of diabetes.

Obesity is a strong risk factor and we all know how many obese people we now have in our modern society. Even worse we have a whole generation of obese children who are at strong risk of becoming diabetic quite early in life. Obesity and lack of exercise has become a huge problem in North American children and threatens to overwhelm the medical system with diabetics in the years ahead. Treatment for diabetes is costly and can go on for many years in most cases.

How can you tell if you, or others in your family, are diabetic? There are a number of common signs or symptoms to look out for.

1. Fatigue and lack of energy.

2. Foods don’t taste quite right.

3. Minor wounds, bruises and cuts don’t heal quickly.

4. Recurring or frequent infections.

5. Vision is poor and blurred.

6. Hands and feet experience numbness or tingling sensations.

7. Continuing extreme thirst.

These are some of the most common symptoms which should cause you to seek medical advice.

Many people who have type 2 diabetes may have no obvious symptoms. If you do not have diabetes at present there are some factors which put you at risk for developing the disease.

1. Someone else in your immediate family has diabetes or there is a history of diabetes in your family.

2. You are over age 65 or younger than 65 but do not get exercise.

3. You are overweight.

4. You have given birth to a bay which weighed over 9 lb (4 kg).

If you have any reason to believe that you may be diabetic you should seek medical advice as soon as possible. The sooner proper treatment is begun the better chance you have to control the disease and stay in good health.



Source by John Mowatt